Where is the dip tube?

The Tank Where is the dip tube?

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • #4624
    paulgoh
    Participant

    Thanks to the anode I bought from this site, my water heater is still running fine one year later (Erm, I know you’ve asked me to remove the anode and check it out, but I have no stomach to remove the anode, maybe I’ll do that a few years later.).

    Just today, I noticed that the slow leak that was there since a year ago has leaked into a fist sized lump of green crystal. The leak was definitely coming from the flex copper pipe, and thinking that it was a simple repair, I just drop by HD to grab a flex copper pipe to fix the leak. After I removed the old flex copper pipe and put on the new one, I can’t seem to screw the other end of the flex copper pipe into the galvanized (or I guessed it to be galvanized) nipple, which seems to be the cold water inlet (I touched both flex copper pipe to confirm where the heat is.) Careful inspection shows that the galvanized nipple’s thread is somewhat soft and corroded and there are some small holes on the thread!! #@$%$#%@, I must have destroyed the crappy thread.

    It is getting dark and my wife will be very upset if she can’t bath. So, I rushed down to HD to pick up a pair of nipples for $10 (they only sell them in a pair, what a rip off.) After a few blisters on my palm, I managed to remove the old galvanized nipple, put in the new one and fix up everything. Just a few minutes ago, it occurred to me that the cold water inlet should have a dip tube that extends to the bottom of the tank, but when I remove the old galvanized nipple, I didn’t find any dip tube!! Furthermore, I saw a valve that controls the water flow, and that was connected to the hot water outlet. I thought the valve is usually connected to the cold water inlet. My water heater is a 13 years old American water heater. I wonder if the installer connected the cold water line to the hot water outlet and the hot water line to the cold water inlet 13 years ago. Weird thing is that my water heater seems to function fine. I have an extra new hot water nipple, but I am afraid to install it, although my old hot water outlet nipple looked pretty corroded.

    #4626
    Larry Weingarten
    Participant

    Hello: With the heater hooked up and working as it should, run hot water at any tap for about five seconds. Now, go and feel the pipes on top of the heater. One will be cold and that is the cold inlet. It should have the shut off valve and dip tube. Heaters do get hooked up backwards, but this little test will help you to make your next step.

    Yours, Larry

    #4628
    Randy Schuyler
    Keymaster

    Paul,

    Whether you should check the anode right now kind of depends on what shape the old one was in when you removed it. I’ve forgotten if we discussed that a year ago. If it was all but gone, you really ought to get your courage up again and check the new anode. That shouldn’t be too big a deal if you used the Teflon that came with it. You don’t have to remove it, just pull it as far out as you can to see what it’s doing.

    Randy Schuyler

    #4630
    paulgoh
    Participant

    NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO………..!!!!!!!!! 😛

    Ok, sigh, the last time I messed around with the TPR valve, it started leaking and I have to replace it. Then, when I replace the anode, it gets so ugly that I have to use my impact wrench. Then I messed around with the leaking flexible copper pipe, and things also ended up really ugly (Maybe the crystals from the leak will grow into something beautiful if I left it alone). Erm, care to tell me why I should check out the anode after 1 year? 😕

    #4632
    Larry Weingarten
    Participant

    Hello: Anode checking. Anodes corrode away faster or slower depending on conductivity of the water and condition of the tank. Worst case is very conductive water and a tank in poor condition. I’m sorry to inflict plumbing pain upon you, but checking the anode now will let you know how fast it’s being used up and indirectly tell you the condition of the tank. I know from experience that unmaintained heaters are vengeful :shock:. Conversely, well kept heaters behave with regal grace :dude: and yours needs to be retrained! Checking the anode is good. Really. Bring teflon tape.

    Yours, Larry

    #4642
    paulgoh
    Participant

    🙁 Thanks Larry. I’ll check it out and let you know, hopefully by this weekend.

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