water heater storage

The Tank water heater storage

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #20652
    jimm
    Participant

    I installed a radiant heating system, using a Bradford White 40 gallon heater with space heating side taps.
    This worked well for about 7 years, and then the heater failed and leaked.
    I could not get an immediate replacement, so I got a conventional AO Smith heater to replace it, since I needed hot water and heating season was ending.

    Now, I have returned to the Bradford White with space heating and removed the AO Smith from service.
    I want to store the extra heater in my unheated basement and possibly alternate it with the other heater, to prolong that heaters service life.
    I was going to fill it with water to the top to keep it from rusting up, I doubt I can remove all the water from it and there is a tendency for things to rust where it will be stored.
    What is the best way to store a previously used water heater?

    #20654
    Larry Weingarten
    Participant

    Hello: Keeping a tank full of water so the anode can protect everything is ideal except for the problems of stagnant water and odor that can happen. You may drain it down every so often and add hydrogen peroxide then refill. This helps to keep the bacteria and odor at bay.

    As the tank cannot be made completely dry otherwise, this is the best way to keep it from rusting.

    Yours, Larry

    #20655
    jimm
    Participant

    The anode would be active in an unconnected heater?
    Would adding seals to the inlet and outlet help with stagnation?

    Thanks for the help, I notice the AO Smith heater, 2012 vintage, has a flat hex head anode flush with the top, would this be aluminum? Is there a way of differentiating aluminum and magnesium if I were to pull it?

    I found lots of slushy white gunk that I assumed was calcium when I flushed it most recently. It dried to a white powder

    #20656
    Larry Weingarten
    Participant

    Hello: All the anode needs to be active is water. Bacteria often come with the water, so sealing on top is fine, but probably won’t have an effect. I wouldn’t close it off fully as thermal expansion and contraction need to be accounted for. It sounds like your heater has an aluminum anode, which likely made that slushy white gunk. Aluminum bends easily while magnesuim is stiff and somewhat springy. 😉

    Yours, Larry

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
Water Heater Rescue

You cannot copy content of this page