Stainless steel nipples and ball valves

The Tank Stainless steel nipples and ball valves

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  • #21990
    Matt515
    Participant

    Does anyone expect that using stainless steel nipples and ball valves has introduced new problems to heaters? I’ve always been told SS is pretty much inert, but then a local metallurgist told me that a bunch of sharks died in an aquarium recently because of the electrical signal created by the interaction of stainless steel and aluminum. It caused them to ram the SS/aluminum intersections, and several of them killed themselves. hummmm

    Thanks!

    #21991
    xygor
    Participant

    Inert doesn’t mean it’s electrically inactive. A current will flow from aluminum to SS if they are connected and in conductive water. Perhaps you should install a whole-house shark filter after the water meter.

    #21992
    Matt515
    Participant

    That’s hilarious.

    While we’re talking about stainless steel and water heaters, how about stainless steel and brass, also?

    #21993
    Larry Weingarten
    Participant

    Hello: I like the shark filter idea, particularly if you have unfiltered sharks 😛

    Stainless and brass together is a very different situation than stainless and aluminum and it should not cause you any problems unless you have some amazingly bad water. I’m finding that stainless now can cost less than the new lead free brass.

    Yours, Larry

    #21994
    Matt515
    Participant

    Thanks Larry. How about a stainless nipple to a steel tank (such as between the boiler drain port and a brass full port ball valve)?

    #21995
    Larry Weingarten
    Participant

    Hello: The stainless nipple would be fine where it meets the brass valve, but I’m not so sure where it meets the steel tank. In that case I know plastic lined steel nipples work well, so can recommend them. If you have fairly clean (low total dissolved solids) water, and feel like doing some science, you could experiment with a stainless nipple. Put it in for a year and then disassemble and look at the condition of the tank. If you see heavy rusting in the port, the stainless is not good for the tank. Then please do tell us what you found! 😉

    Yours, Larry

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