Smelly hot water solutions

The Tank Smelly hot water solutions

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  • #20160
    colinw
    Participant

    LIke many others on this forum I have smelly hot water. I just finished paying to have my LP added to my house (expensive) and replaced my fully functional electric hot water heater with an A.O. Smith LP one: http://www.pexsupply.com/AO-Smith-GDHE-50-LP-50-Gallon-100000-BTU-Vertex-100-Power-Direct-Vent-Residential-Gas-Water-Heater-LP-Gas.

    We are on well water, which is softened and UV filtered. There was no smell with the electric heater. My wife is less than impressed that we just spent a wheel barrow full of money in order to have hot water that smells awful.

    I have received a lot of conflicting information about how to remedy things. The company I bough the heater from suggests an aluminum/zinc rod replacement: http://www.pexsupply.com/AO-Smith-9001453005-3-4-KA-90-Aluminum-Zinc-Anode-Rod but I have read multiple account of people saying the benefits of the zinc rods are limited.
    I have also seen it suggested that, because the water is already softened, I can remove the anode rod altogether. This seems risky, especially when I think of how much I have invested in this.
    And then I found this powered anode rod solution that seems to promise the most effective solution. I read that guarantee and understand that it’s not 100% but is pretty close to it.

    Will the powered anode solution work with my water heater?
    Can someone point me to the link I should use to buy one? Don’t want to choose the wrong fitting.

    Thanks, in advance, for any advice.

    Colin

    #20166
    Randy Schuyler
    Keymaster

    If you remove the anodes, you’ll void the warranty and hasten the demise of the heater, especially in softened water. Softening eliminates sediment buildup but provides no rust protection. In fact, the opposite.

    Vertexes are tricky, but I just got done going through this with someone else. A powered anode for combo heaters can probably be added to the hot port. Both sacrificial anodes will need to be removed. There is one hex anode in its own port. You’ll want to plug the port with a galvanized plug. The other anode is in the hot port, and will come out because it’s connected to the nipple, which you’ll have to remove to make room for the powered anode.

    It would be well to send me a picture of the top of the heater, at mail@waterheaterrescue.com. I don’t want to sell you something, only to find that your Vertex is slightly different from the one I just dealt with and that this won’t work. There is precedent with that, as water heater models evolve.

    Also, because you didn’t have odor before, I strongly suggest that you go to http://www.waterheaterrescue.com/pages/WHRpages/English/Troubleshooting/stinky-water-in-hot-water-heaters.html and follow the simple troubleshooting sequence toward the bottom of the page. Occasionally people buy powered anodes and then find something else is causing the odor. Powered anodes are not odor eaters. They merely protect a heater from rusting without causing odor.

    There is a products link at the top of the smelly water page, but I will not be able to fill the order for another week, as I am on vacation right now.

    Randy Schuyler
    Water Heater Rescue

    #20301
    colinw
    Participant

    Hello all,

    I’m following up to report that I installed the powered anode in my new hot water heater a few weeks back and the smelly water problem was immediately resolved and has not returned. The attached picture is the anode rode on my old hot water heater. It’s down to bare wire, which is why my hot water didn’t smell with the old tank. There was no longer any magnesium with which to react.

    Attached files

    #20302
    colinw
    Participant

    The picture of the anode with all white stuff on it is the magnesium anode I replaced in my new tank. I was amazed by the amount of material on the rod as it had only been in use for about 2 months.

    Attached files

    #21055
    ipkeyper
    Participant

    I have the exact same AO Smith Vertex (Purchase in 2010, “Yellow” top versus green)…. Mine has TWO anodes.

    I’m rather baffled by AO Smith. I wrote them an email regarding the replacement of these with a Powered Anode and they told me that they didn’t offer one for that unit claiming that it would interfere with electronic monitoring functions as well as the Powervent itself.

    What model did you purchase and how did you install it and did yours have dual rods like mine?

    What I find ironic is the new AO Smith Vertex 100 Literature found here… Note that this exact same unit now includes Powered Anode for the Vertex 100!

    Go figure. 🙂 😯

    http://www.hotwater.com/lit/brochures/aosrg01001.pdf

    #21067
    Randy Schuyler
    Keymaster

    I think they all have two anodes: one hex and one combo. Sacrificial anodes do get to looking gooey, but it’s perfectly normal. I’d be more worried if it looked brand new. That would mean passivation and non-function.

    Unless you have odor issues or are using a softener, it’s generally better to stick with sacrificial. They’re a lot cheaper, have no parts that can break, and don’t require power to work.

    Randy Schuyler

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