Should I move tank to garage?

The Tank Should I move tank to garage?

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  • #11402
    TLC
    Participant

    I need to find out if it would be smart to move my hot water heater to the garage. Currently it has been in a closet in the hallway of my house. I have a slab foundation. My plumber says that he can move it to the garage and run lines through the attic. I just had a the tank go out (thanks to A.O. Smith and Sears) and I’m taking care of the three damaged rooms currently. It also leaked about 8 years ago. My concern is if I move it to the garage could I then have a leak in the attic that could possibly do more damage to all of my ceilings?

    If I move it to the garage, I will also need to put a recirculating pump on it, so that we can get hot water faster to the entire house.

    HELP ANYONE–I need to resolve this today.:(:shock::X

    #11403
    undee70ss
    Participant

    TLC wrote:

    I just had a the tank go out (thanks to A.O. Smith and Sears) and I’m taking care of the three damaged rooms currently. It also leaked about 8 years ago. My concern is if I move it to the garage could I then have a leak in the attic that could possibly do more damage to all of my ceilings?

    Make sure new tank is installed on a drain pan with a drain line. Any leaks will drain water safely away. A water alarm is also a good idea in any place where the heater is not normally seen.

    #11404
    Randy Schuyler
    Keymaster

    If the tank rusts and breaks, it’s not going to hurt the attic, since the piping to the house will still be intact. On the other hand, if you have a water heater break every eight years, you should be following the advice on this site — changing anodes and controlling sediment buildup — so that that doesn’t happen.

    Of course, you could still replace this tank and just happen to get a defective one — what they call a “leaker” in the industry — and all the anodes in the world won’t save you from that. But Undee70ss’ advice would protect you there.

    I expect that right now your heater is centrally enough located that you don’t need a recirc pump and being inside, will probably lose less heat to an unheated space. And recirc pumps mean hot water is flowing all the time and radiating away heat all the time.

    So I vote for staying put. But if you do move it, get a demand-type pump instead of a recirc pump. With that, you press a button under the sink and have hot water within a minute. It doesn’t circulate continuously. And have the plumber insulate all the lines.

    Randy Schuyler

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