milky water only from facuet closest to tank

The Tank milky water only from facuet closest to tank

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  • #3437
    Guest

    I read the other post, but I DO NOT HAVE ANY SPURTING FROM THE FACUET. just milky colored water. You can watch it dissolve as you hold it up in front of your eyes. There is no smell. Just all these millions and millions of tiny gas bubbles. The tank is twenty years old. It may have a mag anode, I haven’t pulled it yet. The other faucets do not show these tee tiny bubbles.Just the one that is five feet away from the tank. Tank you.

    #3443
    Larry Weingarten
    Participant

    Bear with me… Water under pressure can hold more gas than unpressurized water. This is nicely demonstrated by opening a soda bottle after shaking it up.:D Gas can get into the water either as a byproduct of the action of the anode or as air entrained in the water, (usually from a private well). I do not imagine there is much anode left in a 20 year old heater. The shape of the plumbing is catching air/gas and delivering it to the one tap. Also, it may be showing up there if it’s the first tap used in the morning. One fix is to put an air vent on the hot outlet of the heater. It would need to be installed in such a way so that it was a high point in the piping, to catch air. A downside is if the water is hard it will tend to clog up the air vent. If this is air coming from a well, than an air scoop on the line from the well would be best. Lowering the pump could be even better. Hope that helps.

    Yours, Larry

    #3444
    Guest

    Thank you for your reply. i’ll try the anode first, then . The water supply is a city system.

    #3524
    Guest

    Well the new aluminum anode didn’t work neither did a new heater. The neighbor has the same problem. It seems to have started when three new homes were added onto the city system up the block. The milky water is all through out the home water system only on the hot water side. I will try the vent and see whats happens. Thank you again. Oh by the way there was nothing left of the twenty year old mag anode. Imagine that.

    #3529
    Larry Weingarten
    Participant

    Hello: Just for interest, I’d be tempted to contact your local water provider and tell them about the air. See what the response is. The municipal supply here does get air in their lines in late summer. They’ve told me it is their well pumps pulling in air along with the water.

    Yours, Larry

    ps. Do put the vent on a high point in the plumbing that air from the tank will naturally float up into.

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