I'm new and need a point in the correct direction

The Tank I'm new and need a point in the correct direction

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  • #23730
    JimShaw
    Participant

    I really need a point in the right direction.

    I’m going to install a new water heater and I keep going back and fourth trying to decide on which to install:

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    Rheem from Home Depot. I can install myself without loosing any warranty (6 years) and save money. I talked to Rheem and the only way I can install a combo rod is to upgrade to a commercial heater. Expensive, not worth it.

    Maybe one mag rod is OK if it is changed out every few years.

    —————-

    Bradford White has to be installed by a pro but only one anode rod.

    Maybe OK if change out every three years or so with Water Heater Rescue’s larger rods

    —————–

    AO Smith from Lowe’s. Has two rods factory installed but aluminum/zinc.

    Change out both rods to WHR’s larger mag rods

    —————–

    Of the three heaters scenarios above which would be your preference?

    All three heaters have 2” insulation and all are 40 gal heaters

    #23731
    Larry Weingarten
    Participant

    Hello, From your list it looks to me like getting the Rheem and simply adding a magnesium combo rod from here into the hot outlet will work. Whichever way you go, try to get a heater that does not have a pro-rated warranty, but a full one against leakage. 😉

    Yours, Larry

    #23732
    JimShaw
    Participant

    eleent wrote:

    Hello,  From your list it looks to me like getting the Rheem and simply adding a magnesium combo rod from here into the hot outlet will work. Whichever way you go, try to get a heater that does not have a pro-rated warranty, but a full one against leakage. 😉

    Yours,  Larry

    “Does not have a pro-rated warranty”. Thanks. Good info.

    The Rheem that can take the combo rod is the commercial heater only and they are extremely over priced by about 4-5 times what I would pay for a Rheem at Home Depot. Not worth the money.

    #23733
    Larry Weingarten
    Participant

    Hi, It may have changed, but historically, Rheem tanks had four ports on the top of the tank; hot, cold, T&P and anode. If the tank has these four ports, a combo anode can be added in the hot port. 😎

    Yours, Larry

    #23734
    Randy Schuyler
    Keymaster

    I think you knew this once, Larry, but might have forgotten: the only combo that can go in a Rheem product is their special half-length “warranty in a box” combo. They re-engineered in 2005 and put something in the hot port that blocks a regular combo.

    Now, Jim, I’d recommend the Smith, and not just because I get a chance to sell you two anodes. There are other issues with Rheems. Their FVIR system has a glass vial that breaks if the system is triggered. You’ll have to a tech replace it before you’ll have hot water again. Other makes have reset buttons. Also a plumber friend recently told me that some of their models have electronic draft diverters that are cranky.

    As to Bradford White, it has a good reputation, generally, but has always used a combo primary anode with a super-short pipe nipple, such that you can count on wrecking the threads if you want to remove it for inspection. It means that the first time you do that, you’ll have to replace it whether it’s consumed or not and might have to replumb the heater a bit to accommodate the longer nipple of the replacement.

    Randy Schuyler

    #23735
    JimShaw
    Participant

    elenano wrote:

    I think you knew this once, Larry, but might have forgotten: the only combo that can go in a Rheem product is their special half-length “warranty in a box” combo. They re-engineered in 2005 and put something in the hot port that blocks a regular combo.

    Now, Jim, I’d recommend the Smith, and not just because I get a chance to sell you two anodes. There are other issues with Rheems. Their FVIR system has a glass vial that breaks if the system is triggered. You’ll have to a tech replace it before you’ll have hot water again. Other makes have reset buttons. Also a plumber friend recently told me that some of their models have electronic draft diverters that are cranky.

    As to Bradford White, it has a good reputation, generally, but has always used a combo primary anode with a super-short pipe nipple, such that you can count on wrecking the threads if you want to remove it for inspection. It means that the first time you do that, you’ll have to replace it whether it’s consumed or not and might have to replumb the heater a bit to accommodate the longer nipple of the replacement.

    Randy Schuyler

    Randy

    This is exactly the info that I was looking for.

    AO Smith it is.

    I talked to an AO tech yesterday and was told if I were to give them a serial number of a heater, they would be able to tell me if the heater had a combo built in by the factory (some do and some don’t.

    I just happen to have a picture of a heater that showed the heater I was interested along with its serial number. I gave the tech the number, he looked it up and told me, Yes that heater has a combo.

    I feel more comfortable buying a heater that has a combo that was built in by the factory even though it is a aluminum/zinc.

    I figure I could get the heater in and swap out for mag rods and have a pretty good heater for many years.

    Thanks guys.

    You have helped me tremendously.

    Jim

    PS: I was told by Rheem that they didn’t make combos for the type of residential heater that I would buy only commercial units which were extremely expensive.

    #23736
    Randy Schuyler
    Keymaster

    If you are planning on switching to magnesium anodes, don’t buy a tank that comes with a combo. You’re just wasting your money. There is no difference in a tank that comes with a combo and one that doesn’t in terms of the heater’s design. It’s just that one has an anode in the hot port and the other has a pipe nipple in the hot port. Also, the factory anodes will be aluminum, not aluminum/zinc. People bandy these terms sometimes as if they were the same thing but they’re not. Al/Zn is used for odor situations and NEVER comes standard on a water heater.

    Randy Schuyler

    #23737
    JimShaw
    Participant

    Yes, I remember now. Aluminum anodes in AO Smith

    Of the three heaters, I think the AO Smith will work out the best for me.

    The Bradford White, one anode, but has to be installed by a pro. $1200

    The below I can install.

    The Rheem at Home Depot $545, one anode only

    The AO Smith at Lowe’s, $630 ($94 more than Rheem) and I can put in two anode rods.

    It will cost me $94 more for the AO Smith vs Rheem plus two rods from WHR.

    To me it seems worth it 🙂

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