Heat trap/insulation

The Tank Heat trap/insulation

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #12679
    jimmyoceans
    Participant

    Have a new Triangle Tube Smart-40 indirect, fired by their 110. There is a Honeywell AM series thermostatic mixing valve at the tank. When “hot” all the fittings and tubing atop the tank are equally hot. According to their instructions, the mixing valve is only 9″ above the tank, which seems awfully close.

    Question is, is there any way to better trap the heat? Or a better mixing valve to use? The tank has only 3=1/2 feet of 1″ pipe between it and the boiler, what would be the best insulation to use on the copper tube. Any suggestions gladly received.:?

    #12685
    Larry Weingarten
    Participant

    Hello: Yours is really a question for “The Wall” at http://www.heatinghelp.com. I’ll add two comments though. If there were a heat trap in the line between the tank and tempering valve, it would keep the valve cooler and slow its getting limed up. As for insulation, molded, jacketed fiberglass is the best, while thick foam rubber or plastic is not bad. Whatever, don’t waste time with thin insulation. I’d stick with 3/4″ or better.

    Yours, Larry

    #12689
    jimmyoceans
    Participant

    Thanks, larry. I hear what you are saying. Which is why I question Honeywell’s AM-series. There placement clearly states “maximun 9″ above the tank.” Not much room for ANY heat trap. I was thinking of the small, dielectric-type of heat trap sold in HD, Lowes, and the plumbing supply houses. But with the tank holding water 140+ degrees, will that work. Perhaps a different brand of mixing valve? Or perhaps piping downward from the tank rather than up toward the ceiling and pipe the heat trap at the same height as the tank top? I am open to any suggestions to solve this issue. Insulation, yes I agree.

    #12690
    Larry Weingarten
    Participant

    Hello: Heat traps are of two types; a check valve device or simply an upside down”U”. I like the latter as there is nothing to fail, it’s easily made of standard fittings and it works 😉

    Yours, Larry

    #12691
    jimmyoceans
    Participant

    Thank you for responding so quickly. Piping the inverted “U” heat trap is not really my problem, it’s the lack of space in wich to do it. I just checked the tank and found the hot water “out” pipe is now 115 degrees, as is the air vent. I would like to find a better way to pipe the heat trap or swap out the valve for one that can be placed further away from the tank, which will allow me more space to pipe out a nice heat trap. It is driving me MaD. I installed this indirect tank to SAVE money/heat loss not feel it radiating off my tubing at tank’s top. 🙁

    #12692
    Larry Weingarten
    Participant

    Hello: I had a look at the Honeywell instructions. They also talk about what to do when the valve scales up, which it’s bound to do when it’s installed so it always “sees” the heat of the tank. I’d call Honeywell and ask about putting in a heat trap. In my mind’s eye, I see the pipe leaving the tank going up as far as it can and then 180 degrees down to the mixing valve. That way, you should be able to get at least a six inch deep trap, which will keep the valve cooler.

    Yours. Larry

    #12694
    jimmyoceans
    Participant

    I like your thinking, Larry. To me the valve is just too close to the tank. I will call Honeywell 1st thing Monday Morning. I also have a Leonard mixing vqalve, #210, which might accomplish the same for me. I really think the heat trap should come first off the tank. I have tried to send an attachment with this, but it keeps coming back “error” file to large.

    Thanks, Jim

    #12714
    jimmyoceans
    Participant

    How about this, come off the factory installed SS nipples at 90-degrees, then drop down 6 or 8 ” into another 90 across and then 90 up, to create a heat trap keeping the heat trapped low? Not exactly the norm, but will it work?

    #12721
    Larry Weingarten
    Participant

    Hello: Plumbing being what it is, you can use fittings or possibly just use copper flex connectors. That would be quick, easy and easy to fix should it need it. Flex connectors come from 12″ to 24″.

    Yours, Larry

    #12735
    jimmyoceans
    Participant

    Well, I spoke to Honeywell and they insist the mixing valve must be within 9″ of the tank’s top–or closer. So I am going to try breaking at a 90* right out of the tank jump up and down and up to create a closer heat trap.

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
Water Heater Rescue

You cannot copy content of this page