Durable water heaters

The Tank Durable water heaters

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  • #4698
    tpeg1
    Participant

    I’m looking for a water heater that wil give better life than the standard glass lined steel tank. Marathon makes a plastic tank heater, heat transfer products, inc makes a heater with a 316 stainless steel tank. The marathon has the higher energy rating ans is thus preferable from a conservation standpoint. Any thoughts or experience on longevity? Thanks

    #4699
    Larry Weingarten
    Participant

    Hello: I like to take “life cycle cost” into account. That is total expenditure over the life ov the unit, broken down into yearly cost. This makes different units easy to compare.

    Glass lined tanks cost less than the other units but, unmaintained, don’t last all that long. So, add the cost of maintenance. Basically, start with installed heater cost… divide by expected lifetime. Add yearly fuel cost. If maintenance is needed every four years, divide that by four and add to the list. You arrive at a yearly cost. I’ve got glass lined heaters over fifty years old still in service. Maintenance really does help keep them alive.
    Whatever gives you the lowest yearly cost is the winner. Hope that helps :cool:.

    Yours, Larry

    #4701
    tpeg1
    Participant

    Thanks for the info. What I’m really looking for is someone who has som knowledge of the track record and longevity of the Marathon or Everlast heaters. On my new home I’m putting in the extra effort to design out weak points and known limited life items, even if there’s some additioal up front cost involved. My background is engineering so I have a good idea of corrosion issues that’s why plastic or stainless steel tanks appeal to me, despite the higher initial cost. The rest of the plumbing is either copper or in a few areas stainless (for parts of the geothermal heating system) so designing out mild steel (with a thin glass coating) appeals to me.

    In my current house I’ve gotten well over 10 years out of my water heater, in another house I owned I was replacing them on a 2 year interval (the water had a pH of about 5…)

    #4707
    Larry Weingarten
    Participant

    Hello: Early Marathon heaters had a problem sometimes with elements blowing out :shock:. More recently I’ve run across some trouble with elements not lasting as they should. Generally though, as long as you’re satisfied you can get good warranty service I’d say “go for it!”

    Do look into a GFX shower heat exchanger as well. It might apply nicely to your situation. 🙂

    Yours, Larry

    #4711
    housebldr2
    Participant

    We are building our new home ourselves and want the most effecient hot water tank and yet keeping it “real”. We have well water and the rotton egg smell problems and was attracted to the Marathon because of the idea of no anode rod. Clean-out design is also easier for maintenance. Anyone had any experience with the Marathon? I know that several electric coops are recommending them. Sound good except for the additional $$. It’s roughly about $300 more for the Marathon, which in the long run does not sound too much????? Any input. Thanks

    #4712
    Larry Weingarten
    Participant

    Hello: You might talk with someone at the electric co-ops for their experience. My limited experience with Marathons is mentioned above. Following is a link to info on the GFX I’d mentioned. New construction is the easiest place to use it.

    Yours, Larry

    http://www.renewableenergyworks.com/products/gfx/gfx.html

    #4925
    energyexpert
    Participant

    You can greatly improve element longivity by rewiring supply voltage from 240 to 120 volts. Output will be 1125 watts. Rewire WH Tstats in parallel rather than master/slave; output 2250 watts. Half voltage means half current. Linear heat generation rate will be 25%.

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